John F. Kennedy on Nuclear War and the Threats to World Peace: “Together we Shall Save our Planet, or We shall Perish in its Flames” | Global Research – Centre for Research on Globalization

John F. Kennedy on Nuclear War and the Threats to World Peace: “Together we Shall Save our Planet, or We shall Perish in its Flames” | Global Research – Centre for Research on Globalization

30-12-17 08:37:00,

The world is at a dangerous crossroads. The threat of nuclear annihilation is real.

What distinguishes October 1962 to today’s realities is that the leaders on both sides, namely John F. Kennedy and Nikita S. Khrushchev were accutely aware of the dangers of nuclear annihilation.

In contrast, today’s president Donald Trump does not have the foggiest idea as to the consequences of nuclear war.

The nuclear doctrine was entirely different during the Cold War. Both Washington and Moscow understood the realities of mutually assured destruction. Today, the issue of nuclear annihilation is tacitly dismissed. 

Communication today between the White House and the Kremlin is at an all time low. International diplomacy is is crisis.

Forward JFK’s 1961 message far and wide to friends and colleagues. Bear in mind that “MISTAKES” are often what determine the course of World History. A Pre-emptive first strike US nuclear attack against North Korea  could potentially precipitate a Third World War.

Michel Chossudovsky, December 30, 2017

***

President John F. Kennedy

New York City

September 25, 1961

Mr. President, honored delegates, ladies and gentlemen:

We meet in an hour of grief and challenge. Dag Hammarskjold is dead. But the United Nations lives. His tragedy is deep in our hearts, but the task for which he died is at the top of our agenda. A noble servant of peace is gone. But the quest for peace lies before us.

The problem is not the death of one man–the problem is the life of this organization. It will either grow to meet the challenges of our age, or it will be gone with the wind, without influence, without force, without respect. Were we to let it die, to enfeeble its vigor, to cripple its powers, we would condemn our future.

For in the development of this organization rests the only true alternative to war–and war appeals no longer as a rational alternative. Unconditional war can no longer lead to unconditional victory. It can no longer serve to settle disputes. It can no longer concern the great powers alone.

 » Lees verder

%d bloggers liken dit: