Keeping The World Poor: The Monopolistic Agenda Behind “Regime Change” Chaos | New Eastern Outlook

09-09-18 07:23:00,

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Development and poverty eradication may be in the overall interest of the human race, but certain powerful forces see it as a threat to their position as hegemonic rulers of the global economy.

Prior to 2011, Syria was a prosperous Middle Eastern country. The Baathist government had taken tremendous steps to improve the lives of Syria’s people. Between 1970 and 2009, the life expectancy for Syrians increased by 17 years, and the infant mortality rate was reduced exponentially. According to the US Library of Congress, in 1981 forty two percent of the Syrian adult population was illiterate, but just ten years later, in 1991, illiteracy had been wiped out by a mass educational campaign.

Syria built the Tabqa Dam on the Euphrates River with the assistance of 900 technicians and a loan of 100 milllion from the Soviet Union. In 2007, China had already begun investing “hundreds of millions of dollars” into Syria for the purpose of modernizing its “oil and gas infrastructure.”

But look at Syria today. Millions have fled as refugees. Over half a million have died. Terrorist groups control huge swaths of territory. Much of the overall infrastructure of the country, including water treatment facilities, power plants, and schools have been destroyed.

Can anyone rationally argue that attempts by western countries to remove the Baathist government led by Bashar Assad have benefitted the population?

Wrecking Countries in the Name of “Democracy”

Nicaragua is a similar story. The government of the Sandinistas, under the slogan of “Christianity, Socialism and Solidarity” has made tremendous efforts to improve the lives of the people. Between 2005-2014, poverty in Nicaragua was reduced by 30%. The GDP increased by 36% between 2007-2016. While its neighbors in Central America ,Guatemala and Honduras, are notorious wrecks of poverty, crime, and underdevelopment, Nicaragua has been a powerhouse of growth. The World Happiness Index even noted how optimism about life  increased more among Nicaraguans than in any other country in 2016.

But, much like Syria, this has been swept away in an orgy of violence, cheered on by western media as “revolution.” The Economist writes “The economy had been one of the strongest in Central America with annual growth of 5%” but in the aftermath of the anti-government rioting “some $1bn in capital,

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