Really Crazy Taxes That Altered Society like the Beard Tax Creating Resistance & Status Symbols | Armstrong Economics

14-09-18 09:32:00,

COMMENT: Mr. Armstrong; As a Canuck, I enjoyed your piece on the window and step tax for I fear Trudeau may start reading your blog for ideas. You have come up with a program that blocks politicians. I love how they call Trump a racist down there showing they are real idiots for they do not know the definition of race. Trump is no keener and that’s why they hate him. I thought I would share with you that here in Canada, during 1885, we did impose a racist tax. Canada created the Chinese Head Tax, which taxed the entry of Chinese immigrants. What would they call that today?

SF

ANSWER: True, Trump is not keener (ass-kisser) but at least you know what he thinks whereas the career boys just smile and lie to your face so you never know. Yes, politicians do seem to get ideas from each other. The US had this civil asset forfeiture and now everyone is confiscating money because that’s what the Americans do. Today, civil asset forfeiture is an outright crime against the people for it is not even a tax – just an illegal taking of innocent people’s money.

When it comes to money, there have been some really crazy taxes and hypocrisy behind it. I would have been discriminated against by Peter I, the Great in Russia. Back in 1705, he imposed a tax on men who did not shave. They had to pay a tax so they did not have to shave. The police were authorized to shave any man on the spot. If you paid the tax, you were given a supply of tokens to give to the police so they did not shave you on the spot. I suspect there was no shaving cream applied, but the brute force with a knife. Here is one of those tokens that were issued to men who paid a tax to be allowed to wear facial hair. I suppose race did not matter, so it was just tyranny. Peter the Great was supposedly trying to modernize Russia demanding that men should be clean-shaven. Nevertheless, Peter the Great was painted wearing a mustache.

Yet Peter the Great may not have actually stolen the idea of a beard tax from King Henry VIII of England.

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