911-unmasked-a-remarkable-review

09-11-18 12:36:00,

Published on Sep, 26, 2018 
 Comments 79
9/11 Unmasked: A Remarkable 
Review

David Ray Griffin
The book 9/11 Unmasked, which I wrote together with Elizabeth Woodworth, has received several excellent reviews. But the most remarkable of these was written by Philip Roddis, who in 2016 had written with vitriol (his term) about the idea that 9/11 was an “inside job.” He wrote: “9/11 Truthism is not only seriously crackers but reactionary too.” What is remarkable about Roddis’ 2018 review is the extent to which he reversed his previous position.
INTRODUCTION
Roddis’ reversal began after seeing responses to his 2016 piece. Most of the responses simply confirmed Roddis’ long-held “contempt” for 9/11 truthers. He had felt this contempt – he recently realized – because he had been “exposed only to lazy, simplistic and epistemologically naive truthers.” Put otherwise, Roddis admitted that his “exposure to truthism had come from armchair conspiracists too idle or brain fogged to put together a decent argument.” Given his long-held certainty that the truthers could not be taken seriously, he had felt no need to “engage with evidential flaws in the official account.” So sure had I been of the logic of my case,” Roddis admitted, I’d seen little or no need to address the empirical underpinnings of [the truthers.] Contempt for truthers had been expressed by many other critics. For example, British political writer George Monbiot said that the 9/11 truth movement consists of morons and “idiots” who believe in “magic.” Calling me the 9/11 movement’s “high priest,” Monbiot described my 9/11 writing as a “concatenation of ill-attested nonsense.”
Likewise, in an essay entitled “The 9/11 Conspiracy Nuts,” Alexander Cockburn used me to illustrate the “idiocy of the conspiracy nuts.” In a follow-up essay, Cockburn wrote: “The main engine of the 9/11 conspiracy cult is nothing [but] the death of any conception of evidence.” Because of their failure to understand the idea of evidence, truthers illustrate the “ascendancy of magic over common sense, let alone reason.”
Matthew Rothschild, the editor of the Progressive, was equally dismissive in an essay entitled “Enough of the 9/11 Conspiracy Theories, Already.” Referring to me as the “guru of the 9/11 conspiracy movement,” Rothschild wrote:

Not every riddle that Griffin and other conspiracists pose has a ready answer. But almost all of their major assertions are baseless…At bottom,  » Lees verder