a-history-lesson-from-glenn-greenwald-on-the-dangers-of-fbi-manufactured-russophobia

15-01-19 09:57:00,

Last week the New York Times reported that after President Trump fired FBI director James Comey, the FBI decided to launch an investigation into whether President Trump’s “own actions constituted a possible threat to national security,” and “whether he had been working on behalf of Russia against American interests.” 

Unsurprisingly, buried in paragraph nine is an admission that “no evidence has emerged publicly that Mr. Trump was secretly in contact with or took direction from Russian government officials.” 

As Glenn Greenwald notes in his latest piece in The Intercept, the FBI dangerously overstepped its authority by treating the President as a national security threat – and it’s not the first time they’ve punished thought crimes that run counter to the establishment’s worldview. What’s worse, people are supporting the actions of an agency gone rogue – judging the actions of a duly elected US president. 

The lack of any evidence of guilt has never dampened the excitement over Trump/Russia innuendo, and it certainly did not do so here. Beyond being construed as some sort of vindication for the most deranged version of Manchurian Candidate fantasies – because, after all, the FBI would never investigate anyone unless they were guilty – the FBI’s investigation of the President as a national security threat was also treated as some sort of unprecedented event in U.S. history. “This is, without exception, the worst scandal in the history of the United States,” pronounced NBC News’ resident ex-CIA operative, who – along with a large staple of former security state agents employed by that network – is now paid to “analyze” and shape the news.

The FBI’s counterintelligence investigation of Trump is far from the first time that the FBI has monitored, surveilled and investigated U.S. elected officials who the agency had decided haroberd suspect loyalties and were harming national security. The FBI specialized in such conduct for decades under J. Edgar Hoover, who ran the agency for 48 years and whose name the agency’s Washington headquarters continues to feature in its name. –The Intercept

Greenwald points to the notable case of J. Edgar Hoover’s lengthy counterintelligence investigation of progressive Henry Wallace during his time in Franklin Roosevelt’s administration,

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