the-russians-are-coming-again-the-first-cold-war-as-tragedy-the-second-cold-war-as-farce-8211-global-research

24-01-19 08:20:00,

The mainstream media continues to harvest all the disinformation it can concerning the relationship between Trump and Putin and the character of Putin himself, not to mention the overall generalizations about the state of Russia and the kind of people Russians are.  Jeremy Kuzmarov and John Marciano argue in The Russians are Coming, Again – The First Cold War as Tragedy, the Second as Farce that Russia bashing is nothing new, extends back to before the First World War, and is for the most part wrong.

There is much material compacted into this short work comparing the first Cold War to the events of the new Second Cold War.  The argument however begins back during the First World War when the Bolshevik revolution overturned the Russian monarchy to establish a country ruled by the proletariat rather than royalty, businessmen, and bankers.  Fearing the loss of the markets and resources available in Russia, the U.S. along with many other WW I allies invaded Russian territory, most notably in the south west and in Siberia.

One of the participants said,

“The American war with russia had no idealism.  It was not a war at all.  It was a freebooter’s excursion, depraved and lawless.  A felonious undertaking for it had not the sanction of the American people.”

In other words, well before Vietnam and many other overseas attacks on former western colonial projects, well before modern concerns about Congress voting on war, the U.S. within its imperial interests had attacked Russia, with the result that “after sending troops to quell the revolution, the Soviets would never again trust the United States, predominantly for good reasons, as later history would prove.”

Although Churchill was one of the supreme promoters of the post World War II Cold War, initiating the descriptor ‘the Iron Curtain’, and always eager for a hot war, it was the U.S. that determined the course of actions leading into and through the first Cold War.  For Stalin, his main goal “was to establish a security belt in eastern Europe to prevent another German invasion and to consolidate influence over Communist regimes there to help revitalize the Soviet economy which had lost much of its productive capacity.”  A CIA analyst wrote,

“The specter of a powerful Russia was remote from the reality of a country weakened by war,

 » Lees verder