Who is Going to Run a Perfect World?

who-is-going-to-run-a-perfect-world?

22-05-19 05:56:00,

By Jon Rappoport

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“Ah, yes.  Utopia.  You see perfection, i see mediocracy.  You see triumph, I see surface gloss and shiny objects and moths drawn to luminous signs and symbols.  You see order, I see walled-in compartments.  You see community, I see the abdication of the soul.” (From my Notes on Technocratic Utopia)

In early human societies, technology was primitive, and top-down control over the population was overt and menacing.

In modern times, technology develops apart from massive political power—or it seems to.

Large numbers of people who work with technology view it as a path to perfection of civilization.  Perfection equals order, organization, coordination, comfort, security, and so on.  Or as one technocrat put it to me, “Everyone and everything in its proper place.”

If you don’t examine what that means, if you just take it as a surface generalization, and if you dream technology can solve all problems, the future looks rosy.

You can even flesh out details of the future.  Buckminster Fuller did.  He proposed that technology had reached a point where every human on Earth could be guaranteed, from birth, at no charge, the essentials of life: food, clothing, shelter, education.

There are many versions of a technocratic utopia.  They all promise a collective triumph for the human species.

But is the fundamental premise true? Is modern technology developing apart from top-down control?  Unfortunately, the answer is no.  At the summit of the food chain, the people in charge see technology as a means of universal control.  They aren’t content to allow innovation with no firm hand on the reins of society.

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