mit-scientists-psyched-about-harmful-5g-and-6g-wireless,-dangerous-ai-and-iot-applications,-and-their-laser-that-remotely-beams-audio-into-people’s-ears

13-06-19 06:14:00,

By B.N. Frank

Why are MIT scientists so psyched about unleashing biologically and environmentally harmful technology that also creates tremendous public safety and cybersecurity risks?  Is it because exposure to wireless radiation has saturated their brains so deeply that impulse control and common sense has been severely compromised?  Because they seem to be acting like the mad scientists portrayed in every book, comic strip, movie, and TV show in their enthusiasm to make us all guinea pigs for known-to-be dangerous technology.

Activist Post reported in January about how MIT scientists created a new laser to transmit audio directly into people’s ears.  That was freaky enough.

Now they are promoting 5G, 6G, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and Internet of Things (IoT) despite the fact that a growing number of credible experts have warned about their biological, environmental, and safety risks as well as their catastrophic and embarrassing failures (see 1, 2, 3).  In fact, even the Telecom Industry has stated they have no scientific evidence that 5G is safe.  So why are MIT scientists endorsing any or all of this?

From MIT Technology Review“Ready for 6G? How AI will shape the network of the future.”

The latest technology—the fifth generation of mobile standards, or 5G—is currently being deployed in select locations around the world. And that raises an obvious question. What factors will drive the development of the sixth generation of mobile technology? How will 6G differ from 5G, and what kinds of interactions and activity will it allow that won’t be possible with 5G?

[…]

5G base stations, for example, are designed to handle up to a million connections, versus the 4,000 that 4G base stations can cope with. That should make a difference to communication at major gatherings such as sporting events, demonstrations, and so on, and it could enable all kinds of applications for the internet of things.

Then there is latency—the time it takes for signals to travel across the network.

 » Lees verder