Rickards: Here’s Where Gold Will Be In 2026

rickards:-here’s-where-gold-will-be-in-2026

09-01-20 09:04:00,

Authored by James Rickards via The Daily Reckoning,

Gold spiked after last Friday’s drone strike that took out a top Iranian military official and is trading at seven-year highs.

Yes, the news was dramatic and made a major impact. But geopolitics is just one factor driving gold. Even without the latest geopolitical tensions, gold is poised for a historic run.

The first two major gold bull markets were 1971–80 and 1999–2011. Today, gold is in the early stages of its third bull market in 50 years.

If we simply average the performance of the past two bull markets and extend the new bull market on that basis, we would expect to see prices peak at $14,000 per ounce by 2026.

What’s driving the new gold bull market?

From both long-term and short-term perspectives, there are three principal drivers:

  1. geopolitics,

  2. supply and demand and,

  3. Fed interest rate policy

(the dollar price of gold is just the inverse of dollar strength. A strong dollar = a lower dollar price of gold, and a weak dollar = a higher dollar price of gold. Fed rate policy determines if the dollar is strong or weak).

The first two factors have been driving the price of gold higher since 2015 and will continue to do so. Geopolitical hot spots like Iran, Korea, Crimea, Venezuela, China and Syria remain unresolved. Some are getting worse.

Each flare-up drives a flight to safety that boosts gold along with Treasury notes, as the latest incident shows.

The supply/demand situation remains favorable with Russia and China buying over 50 tons per month to build up their reserves while global mining output has been flat for at least five years.

The third factor, Fed policy, is the hardest to forecast and the most powerful on a day-to-day basis.

But there’s little chance that the Fed will be raising rates anytime soon. It’s much more likely to cut rates as the U.S. economy faces strong headwinds, especially from rising debt levels. Debt is growing faster than the economy.

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