The Senate’s New Anti-Encryption Bill Is Even Worse Than EARN IT, and That’s Saying Something – Activist Post

the-senate’s-new-anti-encryption-bill-is-even-worse-than-earn-it,-and-that’s-saying-something-–-activist-post

25-06-20 07:15:00,

By Andrew Crocker

Right now, we rely on secure technologies like never before—to cope with the pandemic, to organize and march in the streets, and much more. Yet, now is the moment some members of the Senate Judiciary and Intelligence Committees have chosen to try to effectively outlaw encryption in those very technologies.

The new Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act—introduced this week by Senators Graham, Blackburn, and Cotton—ignores expert consensus and public opinion, which is unfortunately par for the course. But the bill is actually even more out of touch with reality than many other recent anti-encryption bills. Since January, we’ve been fighting the EARN IT Act, a dangerous anti-speech and anti-security bill that would hand a government commission, led by the Attorney General, the power to determine “best practices” online. It’s easy to see how that bill would enable an attack on service providers who provide encrypted communications, because the commission would be headed by Attorney General William Barr, who’s made his opposition to encrypted communications crystal clear. The best that EARN IT’s sponsors can muster in defense is that the bill itself doesn’t use the word “encryption”—asking us to trust that the commission won’t touch encryption.

But if EARN IT attempts to avoid acknowledging the elephant in the room, the Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act puts it at the center of a three-ring circus. The new bill doesn’t bother with commissions or best practices. Instead, it would give the Justice Department the ability to require that manufacturers of encrypted devices and operating systems, communications providers, and many others must have the ability to decrypt data upon request. In other words, a backdoor.

The bill is sweeping in scope. It gives the government the ability to demand these backdoors in connection with a wide range of surveillance orders in criminal and national security cases, including Section 215 of the Patriot Act, a surveillance law so controversial that Congress can’t agree whether it should be reauthorized.

Worse yet, the bill requires companies to figure out for themselves how to comply with a decryption directive. Their only grounds to resist is to show it would be “technically impossible.” While that might seem like a concession to the long-standing expert consensus that technologists simply can’t build a “lawful access” mechanism that only the government can use,

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