5 Serious Flaws in the New Brazilian “Fake News” Bill that Will Undermine Human Rights – Activist Post

5-serious-flaws-in-the-new-brazilian-“fake-news”-bill-that-will-undermine-human-rights-–-activist-post

30-06-20 06:42:00,

Katitza Rodriguez and Seth Schoen

The Brazilian Senate is scheduled to make its vote this week on the most recent version of “PLS 2630/2020” the so-called “Fake News” bill. This new version, supposedly aimed at safety and curbing “malicious coordinated actions” by users of social networks and private messaging apps, will allow the government to identify and track countless innocent users who haven’t committed any wrongdoing in order to catch a few malicious actors.

The bill creates a clumsy regulatory regime to intervene in the technology and policy decisions of both public and private messaging services in Brazil, requiring them to institute new takedown procedures, enforce various kinds of identification of all their users, and greatly increase the amount of information that they gather and store from and about their users. They also have to ensure that all of that information can be directly accessed by staff in Brazil, so it is directly and immediately available to their government—bypassing the strong safeguards for users’ rights of existing international mechanisms such as Mutual Legal Assistance Treaties.

This sprawling bill is moving quickly, and it comes at a very bad time. Right now, secure communication technologies are more important than ever to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic, to collaborate and work securely, and to protest or organize online. It’s also really important for people to be able to have private conversations, including private political conversations. There are many things wrong with this bill, far more than we could fit into one article. For now, we’ll do a deep dive into five serious flaws in the existing bill that would undermine privacy, expression and security.

Flaw 1: Forcing Social Media and Private Messaging Companies to Collect Legal Identification of All Users

The new draft of Article 7 is both clumsy and contradictory. First, the bill (Article 7, paragraph 3) requires “large” social networks and private messaging apps (that offer service in Brazil to more than two million users) to identify every account’s user by requesting their national identity cards. It’s a retroactive and general requirement, meaning that identification must be requested for each and every existing user. Article 7 main provision is not limited to  the identification of a user by a court order,

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