How UK “Track-And-Trace” Data From Restaurants Is Being Harvested And Sold – Activist Post

how-uk-“track-and-trace”-data-from-restaurants-is-being-harvested-and-sold-–-activist-post

13-10-20 06:16:00,

By 21st Century Wire

This latest revelation will no doubt be an embarrassment to what is already looking like a haphazard biosurveillance operation being run by the UK government.

It’s now been revealed that private firms are collecting UK government NHS ‘track-and-trace’ data taken unknowingly from visitors to pubs and restaurants, harvested and then sold to marketing firms for profit.

New reports this week reveal how mobile apps using quick QR codes operating under the auspices of the government’s COVID surveillance operation – are trafficking customer data through opt-in clauses baked into the terms and conditions of data storage services. Some firms state how they will use details scanned in by customers for marketing purposes and even keep your personal data for up to 25 years.

Through this corporate backdoor, aloof customers would have their personal data passed on to corporate clients such as advertisers, big data brokers and insurance companies, to name only a few.

IMAGE: Minister for Health, Matt Hancock, working hard to sell the benefits of bio surveillance (2020)

The Times reports…

Legal experts have warned of a “privacy crisis” caused by a rise in companies exploiting QR barcodes to take names, addresses, telephone numbers and email details, before passing them on to marketers, credit companies and insurance brokers.

The “quick response” mobile codes have been widely adopted by the hospitality, leisure and beauty industries as an alternative to pen-and-paper visitor logs since the government ordered businesses to collect contact details to give to NHS Test and Trace if required.

Any data collected should be kept by the business for 21 days and must not be used “for any purposes other than for NHS Test and Trace”, according to government guidelines.

But some firms used by businesses to meet the new requirements have clauses in their terms and conditions stating they can use the information for reasons other than contact tracing, including sharing it with third parties. The privacy policy of one company used by a restaurant chain in London says it stores users’ data for 25 years.

Gaurav Malhotra, director of Level 5,

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