Corporate Media’s Double Standard: They Attack Whoever They Want, But You Cannot Criticize Them

corporate-media’s-double-standard:-they-attack-whoever-they-want,-but-you-cannot-criticize-them

21-05-21 02:57:00, The Intercept’s live-blogging reporter Robert Mackey, narrating a 20-minute video maligning journalists Julio Rosas, Jorge Ventura, and other journalists who report on Antifa protests on the ground.

On Monday, The Washington Post’s media reporter Paul Farhi contacted me to say that he had spoken with numerous editors and journalists at The Intercept, who voiced to him a wide range of personal and professional accusations about me. This was all in response to criticisms I had expressed about two recent Intercept stories. On Friday morning, The Post published Farhi’s article about their attacks on me.

Among other things, that Post article features The Intercept’s ongoing attempt to depict me as mentally unwell in order to delegitimize my criticisms of their shabby journalism. It quotes the site’s editor-in-chief, Betsy Reed, as saying I have “lost [my] moral compass and grip on reality,” echoing The Intercept’s prior claim that mounting anger at their organization is being fueled not by widespread revulsion over their increasingly unethical and politicized journalism but rather by my “unbalanced tweets.” The Post also quotes Reed as claiming that I have “done a good job of torching [my] journalistic reputation”: liberal journalists, who only speak to and for one another, always believe that the primary if not sole metric of journalistic credibility is how popular one is among other liberal journalists. “He’s a huge bully,” she added.

Depicting critics of liberal orthodoxies as mentally ill, rage-driven bullies, and shadows of their former selves, is a long-time tactic of guardians of establishment liberalism to expel dissidents from their in-group circles. A lengthy 2003 New Yorker smear job on Noam Chomsky headlined “The Devil’s Accountant” — at the time when he was a rare and vocal critic of post-9/11 U.S. foreign policy — described how Chomsky was once a credible voice but, sadly, has now “become increasingly alienated from the mainstream” because he “has no ideas to offer.” Chomsky’s “thinking has grown simplistic and rigid,” the author wrote. She quoted Christopher Hitchens as saying that while he once admired Chomsky’s stable ideology and noble commitment to principle,

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