Will You Love Your Servitude?

will-you-love-your-servitude?

27-08-21 09:41:00,

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Aldous Huxley, an English writer and philosopher, wrote “Brave New World,” a science-fiction novel in which emotions and the sense of individuality are eliminated, starting in childhood, via the use of conditioning

It’s a work of fiction, but concepts on which it is based, including the power to condition humans to accept an abnormal state of life, are not

In the video, you can hear a 1962 interview with Huxley, in which he speaks about the use of persuasion and conditioning to gain ultimate power and control over society

Non-terroristic methods, such as suggestion and persuasion, are also essential in gaining ultimate control, as some measure of voluntary acceptance is necessary

Via conditioning, humans can get to the point of loving servitude, and consenting to live in, and even enjoy, a state of affairs that they, under natural circumstances, should not

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Aldous Huxley, an English writer and philosopher, wrote nearly 50 books, the most famous being “Brave New World,” a dystopian science-fiction novel published in 1932. The world in the novel is a futuristic one based on science and technology. Emotions and the sense of individuality are eliminated, starting in childhood, via the use of conditioning.1

It’s a work of fiction, but concepts on which it is based, including the power to condition humans to accept an abnormal state of life, are not. In this video, you can hear a 1962 interview with Huxley, in which he speaks about the use of persuasion and conditioning to gain ultimate power and control over society.

“If you are going to control a population for any length of time you must have some measure of consent,” he said.2 His words ring eerily true in 2021.

Conditioning Humans to Love Servitude

Frederick Douglas once said, “When a slave becomes a happy slave, he has effectively relinquished all that makes him human.”3 How does a human get to the point of loving their servitude, or consenting to live in, and even enjoy, a state of affairs that they should not?

Often, it’s through techniques of terrorism. While the word implies violence, some of the most profound and dangerous techniques combine methods of terror with methods of acceptance, Huxley said. By bringing in elements of persuasion, it’s possible for a controlling oligarchy to get people to love their servitude.

In 1957, William Sargant published “Battle for the Mind,” which delves into the techniques used by evangelists, psychiatrists and politicians to change beliefs and behavior. Religious leaders produce conversions, Huxley said, by heightening psychological stress, talking about hell, then releasing this stress by offering a promise of heaven. Prisoners of war can be similarly brainwashed and pressured into making admissions of guilt.

Pavlov’s dogs study is one of the most well-known displays of the power of conditioning. The dogs salivated not only in response to food but in response to any object or event that they learned to associated with food.4

The findings also apply to humans, who can be conditioned to associate abstract images with food,

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