Maui Wowie! No 5G Drone Over Hawaii!!!

maui-wowie!-no-5g-drone-over-hawaii!!!

15-10-19 09:57:00,

By B.N. Frank

In July, Activist Post reported about efforts to stop a huge 5G drone from being flown over Hawaii.

Congratulations to Dr. Debora Greene and members of KeepYourPower.org for making it happen:

Yes, it’s true! The Research Corporation of the University of Hawai’i (RCUH) on Friday withdrew its Use Determination Application from the Lana’i Planning Commission!

As you know, they were seeking to use agricultural lands for massive experimental stratospheric drones in partnership with global high tech corporations.

You, my dear friends, sent HUNDREDS of emails opposing the giant 5G drones and caused UH to immediately drop 5G from the project.

Then Hawaiian cultural practitioners Sol Kaho’ohalahala, Lynette Kaopuiki and La’ikealoha Soriano-Hanog, represented by attorneys Lance D. Collins and Bianca Isaki, petitioned the Commission to intervene in the application and hold a contested case regarding the industrial use of lands zoned for agriculture as well as impacts to traditional and customary Native Hawaiian rights.

And you, my dear friends, signed the petition to stop the drones and turned out in impressive numbers in August to the County Council meeting and testified with such passion and profound clarity. I’m so proud of you!

The project also received a notice of violation for constructing the second airstrip without county permits or approvals.

Also last month Lance Collins wrote to Planning Director Michele McLean questioning whether the Commission could entertain the application or petitions until an environmental assessment (EA) had been completed because RCUH is a state agency and this typically triggers an EA.

Is it over, you may ask?

Well, it’s hard to say for sure but, with no application, this chapter is over. We made HUGE progress in protecting our land and sea and skies in Maui County. Yay us!

Lawsuits and opposition to 5G is increasing worldwide (see 1, 2, 3).  In February, Telecom Industry executives admitted they have NO scientific evidence that 5G is safe.   Many experts say it isn’t (see 1, 2,

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U.S. drone strike kills 30 pine nut farm workers in Afghanistan – PaulCraigRoberts.org

us-drone-strike-kills-30-pine-nut-farm-workers-in-afghanistan-–-paulcraigroberts.org

22-09-19 12:12:00,

U.S. drone strike kills 30 pine nut farm workers in Afghanistan

Paul Craig Roberts

The warriors who conducted this drone strike from a safe distance in the U.S. without any danger to themselves other than their moral conscience if they have one are henceforth “heroes.”  “Thank you for your service.”

The majority of the people killed by the US military in Washington’s 21st century wars for Israel and the military/security complex’s profits have been women, children, village elders, weddings, funerals, children’s soccer games, and farm workers.   But this is merely the collateral damage of bringing democracy and the American way to the oppressed.

Everytime I go through the Atlanta airport I am subjected to endless recordings thanking our service persons for their service, and informing the rest of us that enlisted military persons will be first to board.  Service to who? How is someone serving the profits of the military/security complex and the state of Israel a hero?  Our “heros” are lowly paid mercenaries serving evil. Thanking them for their service is like thanking Satan for his evil.

Caitlin touched on this recently: https://www.paulcraigroberts.org/2019/09/20/caitlin-warns-about-false-patriotism/

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-afghanistan-attack-drones/u-s-drone-strike-kills-30-pine-nut-farm-workers-in-afghanistan-idUSKBN1W40NW 

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Drone Startup Gets First-Ever Approval In Iowa To Spray Chemicals On Crops

drone-startup-gets-first-ever-approval-in-iowa-to-spray-chemicals-on-crops

20-07-19 08:08:00,

A tech startup in Iowa became the first legally authorized company to fly drones for aerial application of agrichemicals in the state of Iowa, reported Crop Life.

“Our drone technology had been ready for a few months; we just needed the regulatory landscape to get sorted out,” Rantizo CEO, Michael Ott explained. “Building the technology is the easy part,” he continued.

Record rainfall this spring has decimated the Midwest, including many parts of Iowa.

Rantizo, which developed an easy-to-use drone spraying platform, could soon hit the fields spraying fungicide over crops to ensure parasitic fungi does not spread in the unusual wet conditions.

“Rain prohibited farmers from getting their corn crops in within the timeline they are used to this year. When I last checked at the end of June, only 96% of corn crop had been planted whereas typically they’re at 100% by this time,” Ott said.

“This will undoubtedly affect yields,” he continued, citing that the USDA recently lowered the national average corn yield projection to 166 bushels per acre.

A Rantizo representative told The Gazette in April that the drones will replace traditional sprayer vehicles in the future because the technology is more precise and cheaper to use.

“Our drone technology offers new improvements to agricultural crop applications such as increased field access, reduced headcount and ability to spot apply,” Ott stated.

“In other words, we can get in the fields to treat pests faster, with less people and in more effective ways that require less chemicals.”

Ott told The Gazette that Rantizo faced several challenges with the state of Iowa to get certified for flight. He said the company first needed to get their part 107 and Part 137 certifications from the FAA, which included section 44807 waivers in operating a drone over farmland.

The startup sorted out all regulatory hurdles and was cleared for flight in May. The final license for pesticide application from the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship (IDALS) was recently granted.

“As the first company in the state to request this for drone operation there was inherently a learning curve involved,

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How Iran Decided to Down a US Drone and Narrowly Averted War by Sparing Another US Plane – Global Research

how-iran-decided-to-down-a-us-drone-and-narrowly-averted-war-by-sparing-another-us-plane-–-global-research

25-06-19 03:34:00,

Iran averted all-out war in the Middle East at the last moment when the Central command and control operational room of its Army and the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) ordered not to shoot down a US Navy anti-submarine warfare, Intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance Poseidon P-8 . 

Unusually, there were 38 on board the P-8 aircraft which requires a crew of 9. There were a minimum of 6-8 officers onboard (2-3 Col, 3-4 Lt) and the remaining crew likely held grades under Lieutenant. The plane was flying within range of Iranian missiles over Iranian waters when Iran’s central command and control received confirmation that the US would not go to war or hit any target in Iran. This took place following the Iranian downing of one of the most advanced US drones last Thursday. The drone had been violating Iranian airspace, according to Tehran authorities, who later presented the debris of the unmanned drone to the media. Iran had received confirmation through a third country that President Donald Trump would refrain from bombing any Iranian positions.

“Iran was about to hit and destroy the US Navy P-8 Poseidon spy and anti-submarine Boeing that was flying in the area when we received confirmation that the US had decided not to go to war and not to bomb any control and command or missile batteries positions, cleared or non-cleared, along the Straits of Hormuz. Had Trump decided otherwise, we had orders to hit several US and US allies’ targets and the Middle East would have been the theatre of a very destructive war with huge losses on all sides”, said an Iranian IRGC General.

But how did war almost break out on the morning of June 20th, and how did Iran decide to down a US drone?

An IRGC high ranking officer said

“the Rules of Engagement are agreed to by the Central command and control of the army and the IRGC. These are communicated to the thousands of air defence forces positions spread throughout the country. Decisions are not independently and unilaterally taken by a lone wolf General or the commander of a particular position, as Trump embarrassingly believes.”

“Iran has received detailed information and mission objectives, via reconnaissance and other intelligence means,

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Gatwick Drone Crisis Might Have Been An ‘Inside Job’

gatwick-drone-crisis-might-have-been-an-8216inside-job8217

16-04-19 09:27:00,

Nearly four months have passed since sightings of ‘drone activity’ above the runway at London’s Gatwick airport prompted a 33-hour shutdown that left some 140,000 travelers stranded right in the middle of the holiday rush. Yet investigators appear to be no closer to finding the nefarious culprit or culprits after arresting, then releasing, a middle-aged couple from Crawley.

The information vacuum has been so puzzling, it has inspired speculation that maybe there never was a drone, and that the reported sightings were either a ruse for something more sinister, or a staggering blunder/miscommunication on the part of the airport’s staff. Shortly after the airport reopened, police told reporters they couldn’t discount the possibility that there never was a drone, though they have since determined that the drones were very real, and that the culprit likely acted with “malicious intent” – a real-life Grinch who ruined Christmas for more than 100,000 people.

Gatwick

Now, the narrative has changed once again. Gatwick’s COO has told the BBC that the drone’s pilot “seemed to be able to see what was happening on the runway,” and that the drone ‘attack’ might have been an ‘inside job’. Sussex Police confirmed that the possibility of an insider’s involvement has become a “credible line” of inquiry.

In his first interview since the incident, Chris Woodroofe, the Gatwick COO, said “It was clear that the drone operators had a link into what was going on at the airport.”

Woodroofe, who was in charge of Gatwick’s response to the incident, said he believed whoever was piloting the drone could either see what was happening on the runway, or may have been eavesdropping on secure radio communications. Whoever orchestrated the attack also used a drone that could evade detection by the DJI Aeroscope drone detection system, which the airport had been testing at the time. He categorically dismissed speculation about there not being a drone as ridiculous, arguing that the drone had been spotted by more than 150 people. Though strangely, none of these eyewitness reports have made it into the public record.

Woodroofe

Chris Woodroofe

Sussex police say their operation is ongoing, and that it will likely take “months to complete.”

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Drone Warfare: Should We Focus on Autonomous Weapons Or the Remote “Human Agencies” Directing Them? – Global Research

drone-warfare-should-we-focus-on-autonomous-weapons-or-the-remote-8220human-agencies8221-directing-them-8211-global-research

26-11-18 05:41:00,

Drone Warfare: Should We Focus on Autonomous Weapons Or the Remote “Human Agencies” Directing Them?

A member of Scientists for Global Responsibility has drawn attention to a report by Peter Burt: Off the Leash: The Development of Autonomous Military Drones in the UK.

In a Guardian article, Jamie Doward points out that though the government insists it “does not possess fully autonomous weapons and has no intention of developing them”, since 2015, the UK has declined to support proposals put forward at the UN to ban them.

Israel Defense summarises:

”The report maps out the agencies, laboratories, and contractors undertaking research into drones and autonomous weapon technology in support of the Ministry of Defence, examines the risks arising from the weaponization of such technologies, and assesses government policy in this area”.

“We have already seen the development of drones in Britain which have advanced autonomous capabilities, such as the Taranis stealth drone developed by BAE Systems, and the development of a truly autonomous lethal drone in the foreseeable future is now a real possibility,” Burt said.

A spokesman for the MoD said:

“There is no intent within the MOD to develop weapon systems that operate entirely without human input. Our weapons will always be under human control as an absolute guarantee of oversight, authority and accountability.”

The BBC reported in November that at least 6,660 Yemeni civilians have been killed and 10,560 injured in the fighting, according to the United Nations.

It is hard to imagine fully autonomous weapons inflicting much more death and destruction than current technology under human control.

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Drone opname van chemtrails op vrijdag 5 oktober 2018

Drone opname van chemtrails op vrijdag 5 oktober 2018

07-10-18 10:23:00,

Fotograaf Johan Verhoeven stuurde me de onderstaande video die hij op vrijdag 5 oktober omstreeks 8:15 uur maakte met een drone boven zijn woonhuis. Ik vind zijn opnamen prachtig, maar ook beklemmend.

Het door de chemtrails getemperde licht van de opkomende zon zet het landschap in een goudbruine gloed. Het zijn tinten die nogal vreemd aandoen en die bij mij de herinnering oproepen aan wat je ervaart tijdens een volledige zonsverduistering. Ook dan heb je dat ongemakkelijke, onaardse gevoel. Je ziet een werkelijkheid die niet wezenlijk veranderd is, maar toch ingrijpend anders overkomt.

In de video zie je verder het luchtruim dat over de volle 360 graden gevuld is met chemische sporen.

Johan stuurde me ook de het onderstaande stilstaande beeld uit deze video.

Zie spitsfoto.nl voor meer bijzoncdere opnamen van chemtrails.

Zie ook de posting van gisteren:
Het luchtruim op 5 oktober 2018: stel jezelf de vraag eens of dit wel normaal is

Het luchtruim op 5 oktober 2018: dronebeelden

created by dji camera

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The U.S. Is Building a Drone Base in Africa That Will Cost More Than $280 Million by 2024

The U.S. Is Building a Drone Base in Africa That Will Cost More Than $280 Million by 2024

21-08-18 06:50:00,

A U.S. drone base in a remote part of West Africa has garnered attention for its $100 million construction price tag. But according to new projections from the Air Force, its initial cost will soon be dwarfed by the price of operating the facility — about $30 million a year. By 2024, when the 10-year agreement for use of the base in Agadez, Niger, ends, its construction and operating costs will top a quarter-billion dollars — or around $280 million, to be more precise.

And that’s actually an undercount. The new projections from the Air Force do not include significant additional costs, such as salaries of the personnel stationed at the base or fuel for the aircraft flying out of Agadez. The facility, which is part of the expanded U.S. military footprint in Africa, is now the largest base-building effort ever undertaken by troops in the history of the U.S. Air Force, according to Richard Komurek, a spokesperson for U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa.

The outpost — officially a new airfield and associated facilities at Nigerien Air Base 201, or AB 201 — was once billed as a $50 million base dedicated to surveillance drones, and it was to be completed in 2016.  Now, it’s slated to be a $100 million base for armed MQ-9 Reaper drones which will finally take flight in 2019, though the construction cost is hardly the end of the tab for the facility.

“It’s probably one of the most remote U.S. military airbases ever built,” said Dan Gettinger, co-founder and co-director of the Center for the Study of the Drone at Bard College and the author of a guide to identifying drone bases from satellite imagery. “Most drone bases on the African continent are appendages to larger airports and airfields, but not Agadez. The existing infrastructure is not there. So, the scale of the project is huge.”

Air Force documents submitted to Congress in 2015 note that the U.S. “negotiated an agreement with the government of Niger to allow for the construction of a new runway and all associated pavements, facilities, and infrastructure adjacent to the Niger Armed Force’s Base Aerienne 201 (Airbase 201) south of the city of Agadez.” When the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2016 was introduced,

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Are China’s “Drone Swarms” The Military Weapon Of The Future?

Are China’s “Drone Swarms” The Military Weapon Of The Future?

18-06-18 08:21:00,

China, the country where fireworks were invented back in in ninth century, recently decided to ban fireworks displays in more than 400 cities, a decision that has forced companies and municipalities to brainstorm alternative forms of entertainment that won’t have such a deleterious impact on the environment. One perhaps unintended result of this decision has been an explosion in demonstrations involving “drone swarms” of LED-equipped flying robots, according to Bloomberg. In fact, shows involving more than 1,000 flying drones have cropped up around China – with the robots being used for celebrations commemorating everything from the Winter Olympics in PyeongChang to the Spring Festival Gala sponsored by China’s state-run news channel CCTV.

Drones

And while China insists that these “drone swarms” are for entertainment purposes only, we can’t help but wonder: Will “drone swarms” become the weapon of the future?

While the Intel performance at PyeongChang was pre-recorded, EHang has performed for live audiences. Some drones failed to stay in formation during parts of Ehang’s record show and Xiong said the issue may have been due to man-made interference, but declined to provide details.

Founded by Duke graduate Xiong and his partner Huazhi Hu in 2014, Guangzhou, China-based EHang raised $42 million in a Series B round the following year with investors including GP Capital, GGV Capital and ZhenFund.

EHang’s drones aren’t the only ones getting attention. When state broadcaster CCTV held its annual Spring Festival Gala, the world’s most-watched TV show, it featured Zhuhai-based Oceanalpha’s performance of 80 boat bots.

Of course, organizers of drone displays like the ones we mentioned above must contend with obstacles like the fact that China has strict controls on the usage of its airspace. EHang, one Chinese dronemaker, raised $42 million in a Series B round the following year with investors including GP Capital, GGV Capital and ZhenFund. So far, its swarms have been on display in 20 countries during events like Cirque du Soleil and concerts put on by the metal band Metallica. Most interestingly, drones that are part of the storm communicate with one another via artificial intelligence (a technology that China has also outmaneuvered the US in developing…)

Verity Studios, a company founded by robotics expert Raffaello D’Andrea that focuses on live drone shows,

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