No, Albert Pike Did NOT Predict WWIII — Steemit

no-albert-pike-did-not-predict-wwiii-steemit

14-04-19 10:03:00,

by James Corbett
corbettreport.com
April 13, 2019

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before.

It’s 1871. August 15th, to be precise. The eminent American Freemason, Scottish Rite Sovereign Grand Commander Albert Pike, sits down at his desk and, by the flickering light of a candle, composes a letter to his friend and fellow Mason, the Italian politician Giuseppe Mazzini.

“The First World War must be brought about in order to permit the Illuminati to overthrow the power of the Czars in Russia and of making that country a fortress of atheistic Communism,” he writes (instead of the more conventional, “Hey Giuseppe, how’s the family doing?”)

Then, after gazing a little longer into his crystal ball, he sets to paper some sentences about a conflict seven decades in the future: “The Second World War must be fomented by taking advantage of the differences between the Fascists and the political Zionists. This war must be brought about so that Nazism is destroyed and that the political Zionism be strong enough to institute a sovereign state of Israel in Palestine.”

Most remarkably, he goes on to inform his friend about another great conflict, one that has yet to come to pass: “The Third World War must be fomented by taking advantage of the differences caused by the ‘agentur’ of the ‘Illuminati’ between the political Zionists and the leaders of Islamic World. The war must be conducted in such a way that Islam (the Moslem Arabic World) and political Zionism (the State of Israel) mutually destroy each other.”

Then, licking the envelope and affixing the proper postage he makes his way to the post office to deliver his letter (not forgetting to pick up some bread and milk from the store on the way home like his wife asked).

Sound familiar? Of course it does, because if you swim in “conspiracy” circles, you’ve heard some (probably more dramatic) version of this story many times before. Most recently, this tale has made its way into the hallowed pages of that most respectable and influential journal of record, The Daily Star, which—in keeping with its reserved and understated manner—gave it a suitably nuanced headline:

Mystery 200-year-old letter revealed World War 3 plans – and final battle against Islam!!!  » Lees verder

Exclusive: A new test can predict IVF embryos’ risk of having a low IQ

exclusive-a-new-test-can-predict-ivf-embryos-risk-of-having-a-low-iq

18-11-18 04:41:00,

babies
How will screening for intelligence affect parents’ decisions?

ERproductions Ltd/Getty

By Clare Wilson

THE prospect of creating intelligent designer babies has been the subject of ethical debate for decades, but we have lacked the ability to actually do it. That may now change, thanks to a new method of testing an embryo’s genes that could soon be available in some IVF clinics in the US, New Scientist can reveal.

The firm Genomic Prediction says it has developed genetic screening tests that can assess complex traits, such as the risk of some diseases and low intelligence, in IVF embryos. The tests haven’t been used yet, but the firm began talks last month with several IVF clinics to provide them to customers.

For intelligence, Genomic Prediction says that it will only offer the option of screening out embryos deemed likely to have “mental disability”. However, the same approach could in future be used to identify embryos with genes that make them more likely to have a high IQ. “I think people are going to demand that. If we don’t do it, some other company will,” says the firm’s co-founder Stephen Hsu.

Advertisement

For many years, it has been possible to do simpler genetic tests on embryos as part of IVF. For example, parents at risk of having a child with cystic fibrosis have the option to undergo IVF and select an embryo that doesn’t carry the gene behind the condition. It is also possible to screen for several other conditions caused by a single gene, as well as those caused by chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down’s syndrome.

However, most medical conditions are influenced by hundreds of genes, which has made it impossible to screen out embryos with a high risk of heart disease, for example, or select embryos with a low likelihood of experiencing depression. This is true for traits like intelligence too.

In recent years, it has become possible to work out a person’s likelihood for having certain conditions or traits by analysing many DNA regions at once to calculate something called a polygenic risk score (see “Predicting an embryo’s future traits“).

Predicting potential

Genomic Prediction is the first company to offer polygenic risk scores for embryos rather than adults.

 » Lees verder