Six Questions We Should Be Asking About Covid-19

six-questions-we-should-be-asking-about-covid-19

11-03-20 09:14:00,

Authored by Sharyl Attkisson, op-ed via TheHill.com,

One death is too many – and with careful management and a lot of luck, the coronavirus sweeping the globe will be curbed, in terms of illness and loss of life.

But in the heat of the moment, difficult questions have been raised that will persist beyond the current crisis. Here are six of them:

1. Is self-quarantining good enough?

Everyone would like to believe that anyone possibly exposed to a serious contagious disease would comply with self-quarantine requirements. But history teaches a different lesson. We need only look at TV personality Nancy Snyderman, a medical doctor who violated her Ebola self-quarantine in 2014. She had agreed to observe a voluntary 21-day quarantine in her New Jersey home after reporting in Liberia, where a photographer on her team contracted Ebola. Yet, Snyderman was spotted getting takeout soup from a local restaurant.

There are plenty of examples of lesser-known patients violating quarantines. In 2003, a San Mateo County, Calif., man came down with symptoms of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and got caught violating a voluntary agreement to stay in his home.

Others who are quarantined during public health emergencies might be ill-informed, noncompliant, or even willfully spread the disease.

2. Do quarantines work well anyway?

Maybe not. A quarantine after the 2003 outbreak of SARS in Toronto was deemed “both inefficient and ineffective,” according to an article published by The Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases & Medical Microbiology. A subsequent public health analysis concluded that at least 25 times more people were quarantined than was appropriate, the quarantine was “clearly ineffective” in identifying potential SARS patients, and only 57 percent of people quarantined were “compliant.”

3. How would a large quarantine be implemented and enforced?

During the 2003 SARS outbreak, police in China arrested a doctor infected with SARS for allegedly breaking quarantine and starting a further outbreak that infected more than 100 people. China then threatened to impose the death penalty on anyone who knowingly spread the disease.

If self-quarantining is not deemed effective enough, how would one reasonably enforce a quarantine of large numbers of people in a free society such as the U.S.?

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Some Practical Questions About The Coronavirus Epidemic

some-practical-questions-about-the-coronavirus-epidemic

27-01-20 02:50:00,

Authored by Charles Hugh Smith via OfTwoMinds blog,

Restrictions that allow a significant number of people to move about, either with official approval or unsanctioned “black market” activity, cannot stop the spread of contagious diseases.

Like everyone else, I’ve been reading the mainstream media reports on the Coronavirus epidemic. I haven’t found any information about the practicalities that immediately occur to me, such as:

1. When public transportation is halted and commerce grinds to a halt as people avoid public places and gatherings, thousands of employees no longer go to work. Who pays their wages while the city is locked down? The employers? Then who compensates the employers, since their income has also gone to zero?

Does China have a universal unemployment insurance system that can quickly issue payments to all people who are no longer going to work and getting a paycheck from an employer?

What about the thousands of migrant workers who don’t have regular employers? Who pays them? If they’re technically not officially sanctioned residents of the city, they don’t exist in government records.

2. If people idled by the lockdown are supposed to live off savings, what about all the marginal workers with few resources? What are they going to live on once their meager savings are gone?

3. Given the choice of obeying the lockdown rules and starving or slipping out of the city to find paid work somewhere else, how many migrant workers will choose to slip away?

4. Unlike the developed West, many people in China still have ancestral villages to return to, rural towns where their grandparents or or other close relatives live. If work has dried up and you’re fearful of catching a potentially lethal virus, wouldn’t it make sense to slip out of the city and make your way back to the village where you can hunker down until the epidemic blows over?

Since people who caught the virus may not know they’re a carrier, how will this migration not spread the disease to rural areas with few medical resources?

5. The typical city has about a week’s supply of food, fuel,

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WWI on DVD? – Questions For Corbett

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23-11-19 04:10:00,

PURCHASE A DVD: https://www.corbettreport.com/shop/

Use coupon code “christmas2019” for 25% off before December 1, 2019. Use coupon code “newyear2019” for 10% off after December 1, 2019.

In this first edition of the new, bite-sized weekly edition of Questions For Corbett, Rick asks if The WWI Conspiracy is available on DVD yet.

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