“Shoot The Messenger”: What We Can Say Publicly About Coronavirus & What We Can’t

“shoot-the-messenger”:-what-we-can-say-publicly-about-coronavirus-&-what-we-can’t

06-02-20 10:56:00,

Authored by Chris Martenson via PeakProsperity.com,

It’s Time…

If you’ve been watching our Youtube video series on the Wuhan Coronavirus (2019nCoV) pandemic, you know that it’s time to prepare.

Yes, we can always hope that the latest unconfirmed potential treatment marks an actual turning point (i.e. treating patients with HIV protease inhibitor drugs) . But it’s much better to be safe than sorry.

You’re probably reading this because you tend to think critically, and you trust your own judgment.  Weirdly, that sets you apart from the masses.

And so here you are.  Not because you’re weird, but because it’s weird that common sense and prudent caution are so uncommon.

For a whole host of reasons that extend well beyond this emerging pandemic, we think being prepared is a selfless and prudent thing to do.  Everyone should seek to be as resilient as possible. Our book Prosper! covers this in much greater detail. It encourages readers to build capital.

Yes, build up your financial capital. But don’t ignore social, knowledge, time, material, living, cultural and emotional capital.  If you have depth in each of these, you will be truly wealthy, happy and fulfilled — no matter what the universe throws your way.

A pandemic is a hard kick in the pants that will propel many people to finally begin preparing. If you’re one of them, don’t ignore this important call to action.

For those who are already in good shape — Congratulations! Use this opportunity to re-evaluate your planning, inventory your preps, and then improve upon both if needed.

What We Can Say Publicly & What We Can’t

As with our coverage of the Fukushima nuclear disaster back in 2011, we believe it is our duty to make our gifts of sleuthing, clarifying, and decoding freely available to the world.  That’s what we’ve done in the past, and we’re doing it in spades now — releasing at least one video every day for the past 13 days, keeping the public updated on the evolving coronavirus threat.

But there’s certain content that we cannot put out into the public realm.

Some of it can put a target on our back for the media to use in accusing us of being “alarmists” or “fearmongers”.

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The ‘Forgotten’ US shoot down of Iranian Airliner Flight 655

The ‘Forgotten’ US shoot down of Iranian Airliner Flight 655

07-08-18 01:30:00,

This summer marks 30 years since the shoot-down by the USS Vincennes of Iran Air flight 655, which killed all of the plane’s 290 civilian passengers. This shoot-down of a civilian airliner by a US naval ship occurred on July 3, 1988, toward the end of the eight-year Iran-Iraq War.

This incident is, of course, something that the people of Iran well remember. Americans who rely on the US mainstream media, on the other hand, would have to be forgiven for never having heard about it.

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Furthermore, in the rare instances when the media do mention it, to this day they tend to maintain official US government falsehoods about what occurred and otherwise omit relevant details that would inform Americans about what really happened.

The lack of mention of the incident or, when it is mentioned, the deceptive reporting about what occurred illustrates an institutionalized bias in the media. The consequence is that Americans seeking to understand US-Iran relations today fail to grasp a key historical event that has helped to define that relationship.

How the Mainstream Media Report the US shoot-down of Flight 655

If one does a quick Google search for relevant keywords specific to the shootdown, only a handful of US mainstream media reports turn up on first-page results.

Max Fisher in the Washington Post wrote a piece about it several years ago, appropriately titled “The Forgotten story of Iran Air Flight 655”. For context, Fisher asserted that “the Vincennes was exchanging fire with small Iranian ships in the Persian Gulf.” As explanation for how the Vincennes “mistook the lumbering Airbus A300 civilian airliner for a much smaller and faster F-14 fighter jet”, Fisher suggested it was “perhaps” due to “the heat of battle” or “perhaps because the flight allegedly did not identify itself.”

The Washington Examiner a couple years ago ran a piece with the headline “Iran says 1988 airliner shootdown is why U.S. can’t be trusted”. The author, Charles Hoskinson, stated simply that “An investigation revealed that the cruiser’s crew mistook the airliner for an attacking F-14 fighter jet while involved in a confrontation with Iranian gunboats.”

Fred Kaplan in Slate noted in a 2014 piece that the incident “is almost completely forgotten” (at least in the US).

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