Wind Turbine Syndrome and the Brain – Dutch Anarchy

wind-turbine-syndrome-and-the-brain-–-dutch-anarchy

20-09-19 06:48:00,

By Nina Pierpont, MD, PhD

*The following is the text of Pierpont’s keynote address before the “First International Symposium on the Global Wind Industry and Adverse Health Effects: Loss of Social Justice?” in Picton, Ontario, Canada, October 30, 2010. It is followed by a discussion of several other relevant talks at the symposium by Drs. Alec Salt, Michael Nissenbaum, Christopher Hanning, and Mr. Richard James.

Abstract

The latest research, as discussed below, suggests the following mechanism for Wind Turbine Syndrome: air-borne or body-borne low-frequency sound directly stimulates the inner ear, with physiologic responses of both cochlea (hearing organ) and otolith organs (saccule and utricle—organs of balance and motion detection).

Research has now proved conclusively that physiologic responses in the cochlea suppress the hearing response to low-frequency sound but still send signals to the brain, signals whose function is, at present, mostly unknown. The physiologic response of the cochlea to turbine noise is also a trigger for tinnitus and the brain-cell-level reorganization that tinnitus represents—reorganization that can have an impact on language processing and the profound learning processes related to language processing.

New research also demonstrates that the “motion-detecting” otolith organs of mammals also respond to air-borne low-frequency sound. Physiologic responses and signals from the otolith organs are known to generate a wide range of brain responses, including dizziness and nausea (seasickness, even without the movement), fear and alerting (startle, wakefulness), and difficulties with visually-based problem-solving.

Increased alerting in the presence of wind turbine noise disturbs sleep, even when people do not recall being awakened. A population-level survey in Maine now shows clear disturbances of sleep and mental well-being out to 1400 m (4600 ft) from turbines, with diminishing effects out to 5 km (3 miles). ··

Sensory systems change brain functioning

I confess I have an odd medical practice. I’m a pediatrician by training, but I’m fascinated by brains and development, and essentially practice psychiatry and child development. I’m interested in how to help children’s brains grow well, and, at the other end of the spectrum, in what derails normal brain functioning in normal people—like Wind Turbine Syndrome—and how to get that functioning back on track.

So much of brain function is about the sensory systems—vision,

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Stockholm Syndrome – Julian Assange and the Limits of Guardian Dissent – Global Research

stockholm-syndrome-–-julian-assange-and-the-limits-of-guardian-dissent-–-global-research

18-09-19 07:18:00,

Nothing happened on September 2 in central London. Roger Waters, co-founder of Pink Floyd, did not initiate a protest outside the Home Office. He did not sing and play the Floyd classic ‘Wish You Were Here’, or say:

‘Julian Assange, we are with you. Free Julian Assange!’

The renowned journalist and film-maker John Pilger did not say:

‘The behaviour of the British government towards Julian Assange is a disgrace – a profanity on the very notion of human rights.

‘It’s no exaggeration to say that the persecution of Julian Assange is the way dictatorships treat a political prisoner.’

None of this happened for any major UK or US newspaper, which made no mention of these events at all. Readers of Prensa Latina, Havana, were more fortunate with two articles before and after the event, as were readers of Asian News International in New Delhi. Coverage was also provided by Ireland’s Irish Examiner (circulation 25,419) in Cork, which published a Press Association piece that was available to the innumerable other outlets that all chose to ignore it.

Four months after he was dragged from the Ecuadorian embassy, Assange is still locked up in solitary confinement for 21 hours a day or more. He is still being denied the basic tools to prepare his case against a demand for extradition to the United States where he faces incarceration and torture. He is not allowed to call his US lawyers, is not allowed access to vital documents, or even a computer. He is confined to a single cell in the hospital wing, where he is isolated from other people. Pilger commented at the protest:

‘There is one reason for this. Julian and WikiLeaks have performed an historic public service by giving millions of people facts on why and how their governments deceive them, secretly and often illegally: why they invade countries, why they spy on us.

‘Julian is singled out for special treatment for one reason only: he is a truth-teller. His case is meant to send a warning to every journalist and every publisher, the kind of warning that has no place in a democracy.’

On the Sydney Criminal Lawyers website,

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