Venezuela’s Latest Nightmare: Crude Oil In The Tap Water

venezuela8217s-latest-nightmare-crude-oil-in-the-tap-water

14-03-19 08:25:00,

Authored by Tsvetana Paraskova via Oilprice.com,

Ordinary people in Venezuela are bearing the brunt of the ongoing power struggle in the country and last week’s blackout.

While the power outage in the country which holds the world’s largest oil reserves has shut down oil production and processing operations as well as the main oil export terminal, the blackout has caused massive shortages of running water.

Residents in the town of San Diego in the Carabobo state woke up to see black stuff running from their taps on Wednesday in what appeared to be water contaminated with crude oil.

Local journalist Heberlizeth González posted a video on Twitter, showing that water in the area is not suitable for consumption, and saying that the situation is “terrible” and there are districts without water service for two months.

#13Mar La situación por falta de agua en San Diego es terrible. Hay sectores que llevan más de 2 meses sin el servicio, igual que otras zonas de Valencia y Los Guayos.

Esta mañana llegó el agua a San Diego así 👇🏽 Nada apta para el consumo @Hidrocentro2011 @rafaellacava10 pic.twitter.com/4sfiBv98Zs

— Heberlizeth González (@Heberlizeth) March 13, 2019

Without power, the utilities have not been able to pump water to the homes.

Other residents in the town of San Diego also took to Twitter to complain about the contaminated water running from their taps, Daily Mail reports.

Sky News chief correspondent in Caracas, Stuart Ramsey, reports that people in Venezuela are desperate to find water and that the capital doesn’t have power yet to pump the water. There have been many reports that people, including children, have gotten very ill from contaminated water or food, Ramsey reports.

The Venezuelan National Assembly, dominated by the opposition, has declared a state of alarm over the blackout that the Maduro government blamed on a U.S. cyber-attack and that plunged the struggling country into darkness and chaos for five days.

The Venezuelan government said on Tuesday that some electricity has returned in some areas, 

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How Much of Venezuela’s Crisis is Really Maduro’s Fault?

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16-02-19 10:22:00,


There are several factors for Venezuela’s economic crisis, but you wouldn’t know it by listening to U.S. leaders or following corporate media, writes Steve Ellner.

By Steve Ellner
Special to Consortium News

The recognition by U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and former Vice President Joe Biden of Juan Guaidó as Venezuelan president is the latest demonstration of the consensus in Washington over the nefariousness of the Nicolás Maduro government. Not since Fidel Castro’s early years in power has a Latin American head of state been so consistently demonized. But the 1960s was the peak of the Cold War polarization that placed Cuba plainly in the enemy camp, and unlike Venezuela today, that nation had a one-party system. 

The scope of that consensus was evident by the recent faceoff between two figures as far apart as President Donald Trump and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. In his State of the Union address, Trump attributed Venezuela’s economic crisis to the failed system of socialism. Ocasio-Cortez responded by arguing that the Venezuelan case is “an issue of authoritarian regime versus democracy.”

President Nicolás Maduro, 2016. (Cancillería del Ecuador via Flickr)President Nicolás Maduro, 2016. (Cancillería del Ecuador via Flickr)

President Nicolás Maduro, 2016. (Cancillería del Ecuador via Flickr)

Taken together, the comments by Trump and Ocasio-Cortez complement one another. According to the narrative that dominates Washington, Venezuela is a disaster from both economic and political viewpoints. The exclusive blame for the sorry state of the economy and for the country’s allegedly authoritarian rule lays with Maduro and his cohorts.

Not surprisingly, the mainstream media have refrained from questioning these assumptions. Most of their reporting puts the accent mark on state incompetence and corruption, while skirting the detrimental effects of the economic sanctions implemented by the Trump administration.

In addition, many on the left point to the economic sanctions as responsible, at least in part, for the nation’s pressing economic difficulties, but few critically examine the mainstream’s characterization of the state of Venezuelan democracy. Some oppose the sanctions but join the opposition in bashing the Maduro government.

A recent article by Gabriel Hetland,

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How the Media Uses Venezuela’s Poverty to Demonize Leftist Leaders

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09-02-19 07:21:00,

The weapon’s effectiveness can only be sustained through a media in lockstep with the government’s regime-change goals. That the media is fixated on the travails of a relatively small and unimportant country in America’s “backyard,” and that the picture of Venezuela is so shallow, is not a mistake. Rather, the simplistic narrative of a socialist dictatorship starving its own people provides great utility as a weapon for the establishment to beat back the domestic “threat” of socialism, by associating movements and figures such as Bernie Sanders, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Jeremy Corbyn with an evil caricature they have carefully crafted.

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Both Venezuela’s Opposition and US Reject Peaceful Negotiations

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05-02-19 06:07:00,

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Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro has reached out to Pope Francis, asking for his help to bring about a peaceful solution to the crisis in Venezuela. Maduro is facing increasing international pressure to resign from office two weeks after opposition leader Juan Guaidó declared himself to be Venezuela’s interim president. Guaidó made the announcement on January 23 after speaking to US Vice President Mike Pence, who offered support from the Trump administration. Since then, a growing number of countries have openly recognized Guaidó’s claim to the presidency, including Austria, Britain, Denmark, France, Germany, Spain and Sweden. Italy has blocked a European Union statement recognizing Guaidó, and Ireland and Greece have called for new elections but have not recognized Guaidó’s claim to the presidency. Meanwhile, the Venezuelan opposition and the United States have rejected an offer by Mexico and Uruguay to host talks between the two sides. We speak to David Smilde, senior fellow at the Washington Office on Latin America and professor of sociology at Tulane University. And in California, we speak to Miguel Tinker Salas, professor at Pomona College and author of The Enduring Legacy: Oil, Culture, and Society in Venezuela and Venezuela: What Everyone Needs to Know.

TRANSCRIPT

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro has reached out to Pope Francis, asking for his help to bring about a peaceful solution to the crisis in Venezuela. Maduro is facing increasing international pressure to resign from office, two weeks after opposition leader Juan Guaidó declared himself to be Venezuela’s interim president. Guaidó made the announcement on January 23rd after speaking to US Vice President Mike Pence, who offered support from the Trump administration. Since then, a growing number of countries have openly recognized Guaidó’s claim to the presidency.

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Bank of England will Venezuelas Gold nicht zurückzugeben

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26-01-19 10:06:00,

Politik

07:45 26.01.2019(aktualisiert 11:26 26.01.2019) Zum Kurzlink

Die Bank of England hat einen Antrag des venezolanischen Präsidenten Nicolás Maduro abgelehnt, Goldbarren im Wert von 1,2 Milliarden US-Dollar auszuhändigen. Das berichtet die Nachrichtenagentur Bloomberg unter Berufung auf informierte Quellen.

Demnach soll eine unbenannte Quelle der Agentur mitgeteilt haben, die Entscheidung, kein Gold auszugeben, sei getroffen worden, nachdem hochrangige US-Beamte, darunter US-Außenminister Mike Pompeo und der Nationale Sicherheitsberater-Berater des US-Präsidenten, John Bolton, Druck auf die Kollegen in Großbritannien ausgeübt hätten.

©
REUTERS / Luisa Gonzalez

Die US-amerikanischen Beamten versuchen laut Bloomberg nun, die im Ausland aufbewahrten Vermögenswerte von Venezuela an Juan Guaidó zu entsenden, der sich zum Übergangspräsidenten Venezuelas erklärt hatte. Dies ziele darauf ab, die Chancen von Guaidó zu erhöhen, die Kontrolle über die Regierung zu gewinnen.

Die gesamten ausländischen Währungsreserven der venezolanischen Zentralbank betragen Bloomberg zufolge acht Milliarden Dollar. Ein Teil von ihnen befinde sich in der Bank of England, dabei sei unklar, wo der Rest der Vermögenswerte sind.

Juan Guaidó

selbst habe die Entscheidung der Bank of England als Schutz der Vermögenswerte Venezuelas bezeichnet. „Wir werden keinen weiteren Missbrauch zulassen, und dass Geld für Nahrungsmittel, Medizin und die Zukunft unserer Kinder gestohlen wird, auch nicht“, schrieb er in einem Twitter-Beitrag.

Weitere Sputnik-Artikel: Venezuela: Maduro lehnt Rücktritt ab

Zuvor war berichtet worden, Caracas wolle die Goldbarren im Wert von 550 Millionen US-Dollar von der Bank of England zurückholen, weil befürchtet wird, dass sie wegen Sanktionen gegen das Land blockiert werden könnten. Laut der Nachrichtenagentur Reuters handelt es sich um ungefähr 14 Tonnen Gold. Die Umsetzung dieser Pläne habe sich etwa um zwei Monate verzögert, da es schwierig gewesen sei, die notwendige Versicherung für den Transport einer so großen Goldladung zu erhalten.

Am 21. Januar hatten in Venezuela Massenproteste gegen den derzeitigen Präsidenten Nicolás Maduro begonnen. Bei den während der Proteste erfolgten Zusammenstößen waren Menschen ums Leben gekommen. Oppositionsführer Juan Guaidó erklärte sich am 23. Januar zum Interimspräsidenten. Die USA und eine Reihe lateinamerikanischer Länder erkannten Guaidó unverzüglich als solchen an. Maduro, der im Januar seine zweite Amtszeit angetreten hatte, kündigte daraufhin den Abbruch der Beziehung zu den USA an.

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Venezuelas Präsident Nicolás Maduro entgeht Anschlag und beschuldigt Kolumbien

Venezuelas Präsident Nicolás Maduro entgeht Anschlag und beschuldigt Kolumbien

05-08-18 06:46:00,

Venezuelas Präsident Nicolás Maduro entgeht Anschlag und beschuldigt Kolumbien

Venezuelas Staatschef Nicolás Maduro ist am Samstagabend einem Anschlag entgangen und hat umgehend seinen kolumbianischen Kollegen Juan Manuel Santos der Urheberschaft bezichtigt. Im Staatsfernsehen war eine Explosion zu hören, während Nicolás Maduro während einer Militärparade in Caracas vor tausenden Soldaten eine Rede hielt. Der Staatschef blieb dabei unverletzt. Nach Angaben des Regierungssprechers Jorge Rodríguez erlitten sieben Menschen Verletzungen.

“Ein Teil der Verantwortlichen dieses Attentats ist bereits gefasst worden”, sagte der venezolanische Staatschef kurz nach dem Zwischenfall. Er sei sich sicher, dass man ihn habe ermorden wollen. “Ich hege keine Zweifel, dass dahinter die extreme Rechte und Juan Manuel Santos stecken”, fügte Nicolás Maduro hinzu.

#EnDirecto 🔴 | Vicepresidente Sectorial Jorge Rodríguez: Cuando estaba culminando el acto de la GNB se escucharon unas detonaciones que correspondían a artefactos voladores de tipo dron que contenían una carga explosiva que detonó en las cercanías de la tarima presidencial pic.twitter.com/MO7eWQcYrl

— VTV CANAL 8 (@VTVcanal8) 4. August 2018

Befreundete sozialistische Staaten wie Bolivien, Kuba und Nicaragua solidarisierten sich mit dem Politiker. Kolumbiens Regierung wies die Vorwürfe kategorisch zurück. “Das entbehrt jeder Grundlage”, sagte ein Sprecher in Bogotá. (dpa)

Mehr zum Thema – IWF: Inflation in Venezuela erreicht bald eine Million Prozent

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